FDA Ordered Stop of Seven Tobacco Products

August 29, 2014
On August 28, 2014, the FDA issued orders to Star Scientific, Inc., finding 7 dissolvable tobacco products as “not substantially equivalent” to their predicate products. This means that these products may not be sold, marketed, or distributed. Learn more about the orders and how to report violations on FDA’s website.

 

Local health departments are encouraged to share this information with their tobacco compliance staff and the public. Use these sample Facebook and Twitter messages to share the news and direct viewers to your own website or the FDA.

 

Facebook post: The FDA ordered a manufacturer to stop sales, marketing, and distribution of 7 dissolvable tobacco products that do not meet requirements (“not substantially equivalent”). Learn more about which products are restricted and how to report violations at _________________.

 

Tweet: FDA ordered a stop to sales, marketing, distribution of 7 tobacco products. Find out why and how to report violations at ____________________.

 

 

Connect with the Tobacco Prevention and Control Team 

NACCHO welcomes requests from any local health department for tobacco prevention planning and technical assistance. Please send your request to tobacco@naccho.org. Find resources, policy statements, news, and more on NACCHO’s Tobacco webpage.

 From National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO) Tobacco Alert 8/29

ADHS Job Alert: Tobacco CDC Grant Program Manager

August 28, 2014

Click Here for information on this opportunity with ADHS.

1809 HPM 2 Tob CDC Grant Prg Mgr 8 27 14_Page_1


Registration Open: AZ Health Equity Conference

August 27, 2014

On behalf of the Arizona Health Equity Conference Planning Committee, we are pleased to announce that REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN. This statewide conference will take place on Thursday, October 30th at the Glendale Civic Center. It will highlight the current health equity research and outreach taking place in Arizona, and will connect partners to promote new collaborations. Attendees will include physicians, nurses, researchers, clinicians, public health professionals, community health workers, social workers, and non-profit partners. Continuing education credits through AZPHA and GVAHEC are also being pursued. Spots are limited, and we have received high interest, so we highly encourage you to sign up as soon as possible. Please click on the conference website for the agenda, and share broadly.

 

Thank you!

 

Chara Chamie & Members of the Planning Team

 

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Curt Schilling Reveals He Was Diagnosed With Mouth Cancer in February, Believes Chewing Tobacco Was the Cause

August 20, 2014

davis_soxpre5_sptsCurt Schilling, the former Red Sox pitcher and ESPN analyst, announced today during the WEEI/NESN Jimmy Fund Radio Telethon that he was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma — which is cancer in the mouth — in February.

“This all came about from a dog bite,” Schilling said. “I got bitten by a dog and I had some damage to my finger and I went to see a doctor, and the day that I went to see the doctor, I was driving and I went to rub my neck and I felt a lump on the left side of my neck. And I knew immediately it wasn’t normal. So there happened to be an ENT [Ear, Nose, and Throat] right next door to the hand doctor, and I thought what the heck, let me just stop in and see and so I waited in the office and went in there and they did the biopsy, and two days later, they diagnosed me with squamous cell carcinoma.

“You know what the amazing thing was? And I was just dumbfounded by it. You’ve just been told you have cancer and you walk out into the public and the world’s still going on and it was really a challenge to wrap my head around that. My second thought was, ‘Yeah, really, you think I can handle this too?’ So after a couple of tests, I got sent over to Brigham and Women’s and Dana-Farber and that’s where I met Dr. Haddad and the amazing team of people that got me through my treatment.”

Dr. Robert Haddad, from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, described Schilling’s cancer.

“Commonly this is known as mouth cancer,” Dr. Haddad said. “This is the type of the cancer we call the squamous cell carcinoma. It’s cancer of the lining of the mouth and the lump in the neck is why most patients go to the doctor first, because they feel the lump in the neck so that’s the lymph node that’s enlarged and that’s the most common presentation for these cancers. It often presents as a lump in the neck that drives the patient to go see the doctor, and then the biopsy is done and then that shows squamous cell carcinoma, and that’s the type of the cancer.”

Schilling stressed the importance of getting in for treatment early.

“One of the amazing things was early on when I was talking to [Dr. Haddad] about this, I literally went to see a doctor like five days after I felt the lump, he said the average time for a patient is 10 months,” Schilling said. “Ten months from the time they notice something to the time they say something. I can’t believe… people need to be more self-aware.

“I didn’t talk about it for two reasons. No. 1, I didn’t want to get into the chewing tobacco debate, which I knew was going to come about, which to me, I’ll go to my grave believing that was why I got what I got… absolutely, no question in my mind about that. And the second thing was I didn’t want people to feel sorry for me. I didn’t want the pity or any of that stuff because early on… I ended up spending about six months in the hospital because I had a bad reaction. I had a staph infection. I had what’s called C. diff. I had a couple different problems and there was a week there, there’s a week of my life I don’t remember while I was in the hospital going through this.

“The second or third day — I got chemo and radiation for seven weeks — and I came back to the room and my family was sitting there and I thought, ‘You know what, this could be so much worse. It could be one of my kids, it’s not. I’m the one guy in my family that can handle this,’ and so from that perspective it never, ever said ‘Why me? And I never will. I do believe without a doubt, unquestionably that chewing is what gave me cancer and I’m not going to sit up here from the pedestal and preach about chewing. I will say this: I did for about 30 years. It was an addictive habit. I can think of so many times in my life when it was so relaxing to just sit back and have a dip and do whatever, and I lost my sense of smell, my taste buds for the most part. I had gum issues, they bled, all this other stuff. None of it was enough to ever make me quit. The pain that I was in going through this treatment, the second or third day it was the only thing in my life that had that I wish I could go back and never have dipped. Not once. It was so painful.”

Dr. Haddad concurred that chewing tobacco leads to the mouth cancer Schilling was diagnosed with.

“One of the directs for oral cancer is smokeless tobacco, just what we’re talking about here,” Dr. Haddad said. “So it is not a question mark. This is shown repeatedly and the National Cancer Institute clearly makes the case that any form of tobacco is harmful and should not be used.”

Schilling spoke about the day he found out about Tony Gwynn’s death. Gwynn – a Hall of Famer — died of salivary gland cancer on June 16 at the age of 54. Gwynn blamed his mouth cancer on his habit of dipping smokeless tobacco during his 20-year career with the San Diego Padres.

“I knew a while ago that things were not going well just because he went radio silent after everything that happened,” Schilling said. “From the people I talked to, he was in very, very bad shape at the end. Again, I got lucky. There’s so may other places this could have come up and they could have had to take half my jaw. I met a guy — so I was Brigham and Women’s palliative care floor, the fifth floor, which is kind of a new thing and an amazing thing — who had, smoker, who had cancer of the mouth and they had to cut off half of his tongue and they went down and grafted from his forearm and rebuilt it back. Just the stuff was mind boggling…

“I’ve seen Dana-Farber from the other side. As someone who’s been around spring training with the kids. I’ve been over there and visited a couple of times, but being on this side of it was mind boggling.”

In April, Schilling’s wife Shonda — herself a melanoma survivor — tweeted that Schilling had finished radiation.

On Facebook, Schilling wrote, “To the many, many amazing folks at Dana Farber, [Brigham and Women’s Hospital] and [Massachusetts General Hospital], thank you and to the amazing team these last 5 months. I’ve been told my cancer is in remission, start the 5-year clock.”

On June 25, Schilling tweeted: “As of yesterday I am in remission. Start the 5 year clock!”

Schilling, who spent four seasons of his 20-year major league career with the Red Sox and was instrumental in their World Series victories in 2004 and ’07, joined ESPN as a studio analyst for ESPN’s “Baseball Tonight” in 2010.

In December, he was chosen to replace Orel Hershiser for the high-profile role as a color analyst on ESPN’s “Sunday Night Baseball” broadcasts alongside Dan Shulman and John Kruk.

Schilling pitched for five teams during his major league career, winning 216 games and compiling 3,116 strikeouts. He made six All-Star teams, won at least 21 games in a season three times — including in 2004 with the Red Sox. He won his first of three World Series titles with the 2001 Diamondbacks.

Schilling had found his niche as an analyst after enduring some difficult times in recent years. A video game business suffered a prominent and costly failure in Rhode Island, one that cost the state tens of millions of dollars and Schilling the bulk of his baseball fortune. He revealed to the Globe’s Stan Grossfeld in an August 2013 story that he suffered a heart attack in November 2011 that required surgery to implant a stent in an artery.

Listen to Schilling’s complete interview on WEEI here.


Now available: Standardized Tobacco Assessment for Retail Settings (STARS) surveillance tool and

August 15, 2014

We are excited to announce that the Standardized Tobacco Assessment for Retail Settings (STARS) surveillance tool and accompanying training materials are now available on the State and Community Tobacco Control (SCTC) Research Initiative website here: http://www.sctcresearch.org/blog/public/standardized-tobacco-assessment-retail-settings-stars-surveillance-tool

The STARS package is intended for use by self-trained adults and youth to gather information on the retail tobacco environment, which can inform effective tobacco control policy solutions. The STARS tool has 20 items assessing placement, promotion, price and availability of tobacco products in the retail setting.  Training materials include a 93-slide PowerPoint presentation for individual- or group-administered instruction, and a Pocket Guide to be used in the field.  An Excel Data Entry Template is also provided for organizing and analyzing STARS data.

I hope you find the STARS tool and supporting materials to be user-friendly and policy relevant.  Please forward this e-mail to your professional colleagues, community coalition members, and others interested in protecting our communities from the impact of retail tobacco marketing.

 

Best,

Nikie Sarris, MPH

Research Public Health Analyst

Community Health Promotion Research

RTI International

 


Phoenix teen’s art to inspire Hugo Medina mural

August 11, 2014

Ross Dunham, The Republic | azcentral.com

A Phoenix North High School student’s anti-smoking art will be the inspiration for a mural by well known Valley artist Hugo Medina.

Students Taking a New Direction (STAND), Arizona’s anti-smoking youth coalition, asked student artists all over Arizona to create and submit art that inspired others “to take a STAND against tobacco.”

Joseline Valenzuela, 18, earned the 2014 “Art of Resistance” top pick and $200 in art supplies for her piece titled, “Make the Right Choice.”

Valenzuela’s art will be the inspiration for a Medina mural later this year at a location yet to be determined. The art will also be featured as the cover photo on the STAND Facebook page.

Medina, is a 41-year-old Phoenix resident and native of Bolivia, who participated in the Calle16 mural project in 2010, creating murals along 16th Street in Phoenix.

The Republic and azcentral.com conducted a readers’ choice poll featuring 13 entries in the “Art of Resistance” contest.

With 50 percent of the votes, “From Life to Death,” by Jennifer Ramos of Phoenix Trevor G. Browne High School, was the top reader pick.

Valenzuela’s work came in second with 30 percent of the votes.

Republic reporter David Madrid contributed to this article.

To read this article online or view the murals, visit this link.


Jesse L. Steinfeld, Surgeon General and Tobacco Foe, Dies at 87

August 7, 2014
Photo

Dr. Jesse L. Steinfeld in 1972, when he was surgeon general.  Credit Associated Press

The cause was complications of a stroke, his daughter Susan Steinfeld said.

Dr. Steinfeld had been a top official at the National Cancer Institute under President Lyndon B. Johnson before President Richard M. Nixon named him surgeon general in December 1969. He soon developed a contentious relationship with the tobacco industry, which lobbied for his dismissal.

Along with many other top administration officials, he was asked to submit his resignation after Nixon’s re-election in November 1972. He later said that he had not expected the resignation to be accepted, but it was. Nixon did not appoint a permanent successor.

Dr. Steinfeld said he believed he lost the job because of his efforts to reduce smoking and his concerns about violence on television.

Read the rest of this entry »


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