Smoking In America Today

In this Saturday, March 2, 2013 photo, a cigarette burns in an ashtray in Hayneville, Ala. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

In this Saturday, March 2, 2013 photo, a cigarette burns in an ashtray in Hayneville, Ala.
(AP Photo/Dave Martin

On the latest edition of NPR’s The Diane Rehm Show.  

Nearly 90 million Americans are smokers or former smokers. But the number of adults smoking traditional cigarettes is on the decline. Causes include tax hikes, smoking bans, health concerns and social stigma. Tobacco companies and others have taken notice: electronic cigarettes have become a booming business, and new research is being done to drastically lower nicotine levels in regular cigarettes. Many think these new developments could save thousands of lives, while others worry they provide a false sense of security and want the Food and Drug Administration to step in soon with new regulations on nicotine. Diane and her guests discuss the latest trends in smoking in America today.

Guests

Dr. Tim McAfee, director of Office of Smoking and Health with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Mitch Zeller, director of Center for Tobacco Products at the Food and Drug Administration.
Dr. Thomas Glynn, director of Cancer Science and Trends for the American Cancer Society.
Michael Felberbaum, reporter for Associated Press.
Craig Weiss, president and CEO of NJOY, makers of electronic cigarettes.
Click Here to Follow the Link where you can listen to the broadcast.

3 Responses to Smoking In America Today

  1. Elizabeth says:

    It is great to hear that less people are smoking, Thanks for sharing the broadcast.

  2. It’s great to hear that less people are smoking but 90 million is still a lot of smokers.

  3. Brett James says:

    Wow 90 million that is so many people, I hope the numbers don’t go up.

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