A Sad Lesson About COPD From Leonard Nimoy

March 3, 2015

Leonard Nimoy in 2013

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Actor Leonard Nimoy — Mr. Spock to his legions ofStar Trek fans — has died at age 83 from a destructive lung disease called COPD, telling his fans in a poignant tweet last month: “Don’t smoke. I did. Wish I never had.”

His wife confirmed his death to the New York Times,saying the cause was end-stage COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He had been hospitalized earlier in the week.

COPD is one of the most common lung diseases and the third leading cause of death in the U.S., causing nearly 135,000 deaths a year. There is no cure. COPD causes inflammation and damage to the lung tissue, making it increasingly difficult to breathe. Symptoms include a chronic cough, shortness of breath and frequent respiratory infections.

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New Orleans Goes Smoke-Free

January 23, 2015

NOLA

 

On January 22nd  the New Orleans City Council passed an ordinance making all indoor public spaces smoke-free!

Residents and tourists alike will now be able to enjoy all that the Big Easy has to offer while enjoying clean air. And employees in bars, music venues, casinos and other workplaces won’t be forced to breathe secondhand smoke in order to earn a paycheck.

This huge victory is the result of months of work by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and our partners in the #SmokeFreeNOLA campaign – and supporters like you who helped us send a clear message to City Council.

Whether you live in New Orleans or just love to visit, you can join us in thanking Councilwoman Cantrell and the rest of the City Council by sending them a letter.

Thank you for your support. And as we say in NOLA, “Laissez les bon temps rouler!”

Sincerely,

Claudia Rodas
Director, Southern Region


Arizona’s anti-tobacco programs performing well but underfunded

January 7, 2015

By Sandra Haros , Reporter KTAR | January 6, 2015

 

Unlike other U.S. states, Arizona is doing well when it comes funding for anti-tobacco programs, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

“We rank well within the top ten in terms of funding dedicated to these types of programs,” said Wayne Tormala, ADHS Chief for the Bureau of Tobacco and Chronic Disease.

Arizona, indeed, ranks 8th in total money spent on tobacco prevention programs.

However, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the state is guilty of underfunding the programs. A recent report suggests the state will spend just under 19 million dollars on these types of programs that have proven efficient in stopping kids from smoking. According to the campaign’s website, only North Dakota and Alaska currently fund tobacco prevention programs at the levels recommended by the Center for Disease Control.

“Relative to other states, we are doing quite well,” Tormala rebutted. “In fact, over the past few years, over 100,000 teenagers have quit smoking.”

In a report issued late last year, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids revealed that more than 50,000 Arizona high school students smoke — about 14 percent of all such students in the state. That number is about two percent lower than adults who smoke in the state.

The campaign also reported that Arizona ranks 17th in percent of CDS-recommended funding levels. The U.S. as a whole, it says, cumulatively spent just 1.9 percent of its overall tobacco revenue in 2014 on tobacco prevention programs.

 

http://ktar.com/22/1796290/Arizonas-antitobacco-programs-performing-well-but-underfunded


Ironwood HS STAND Gets featured in Peoria Pulse

January 7, 2015

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Click Here to download the Pulse


Study offers support for the notion of e-cigarettes as a gateway drug

December 16, 2014
A new study offers support for the idea that electronic cigarettes can serve as a gateway drug to regular smoking. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

A new study offers support for the idea that electronic cigarettes can serve as a gateway drug to regular smoking. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

By KAREN KAPLAN

Study finds significant overlap between use of electronic and regular cigarettes. Does one lead to the other?
29% of the high school students surveyed had used e-cigarettes at least once, researchers say
Among ninth and 10th graders who had tried e-cigarettes, 41% also smoked traditional cigarettes
Do e-cigarettes lure teens into a world of vice that turns them into smokers of regular cigarettes? This is the big fear of anti-smoking activists, and new data from Hawaii suggest they may be right.

A survey of 1,941 ninth- and 10th-graders from Oahu found that 29% of them had tried electronic cigarettes at least once, and that 18% of them had used the devices in the last month, according to a study published Monday by the journal Pediatrics.

These figures represent a substantial jump from e-cigarette smoking rates reported in earlier years. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Youth Tobacco Survey, for instance, found that 10% of U.S. teens had tried e-cigarettes in 2012, up from 4.7% in 2011.

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Pima County may quit hiring smokers, start penalizing current tobacco-using employees

December 9, 2014

Staff
Phoenix Business Journal

Pima County is considering a ban on hiring smokers.

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The Pima County Board of Supervisors is set to vote on a measure that would ban the county from hiring smokers and penalize current county employees who use tobacco.

If voted in, the policy would start in July 2015, the Arizona Daily Star reported.

http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/morning_call/2014/12/pima-county-may-quit-hiring-smokers-start.html


Navajo Nation president approves junk-food tax

December 5, 2014
By FELICIA FONSECA

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The sales tax on cookies, chips, sodas and other junk food sold on the country’s largest American Indian reservation is going up.

Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly signed legislation Friday to increase by 2 percent the sales tax on food with little to no nutritional value, starting next year. No other sales tax on the Navajo Nation specifically targets the spending habits of consumers. It will remain in effect until 2020, but it can be extended by the Navajo Nation Council.

Navajos advocating for a junk-food tax said they wanted to pass a bill that could serve as a model for Indian Country to improve the rates of diabetes and obesity among tribal members. Proposals targeting sugary drinks with proposed bans, size limits, tax hikes and warning labels haven’t gained widespread traction across the country.

“We want them to think twice about buying healthy foods instead of soda pop, potato chips and the junk food,” said Gloria Begay, an advocate of the tax. “The effort is really much more in the message of Navajo people making better choices for quality foods.”

The bill cited statistics from the Navajo-area Indian Health Service that said about one-third of Navajos are diabetic or pre-diabetic, and the obesity rate for some age groups is as high as 60 percent. Diabetes was the fourth-leading cause of death in the Navajo area from 2003 to 2005, the health service said.

The $1 million-a-year that the additional tax is expected to generate will pay for projects including farmer’s markets, vegetable gardens and wellness and exercise equipment in the tribe’s 110 communities. Begay said advocates as well as members of the Dine Community Advocacy Alliance have been meeting with tribal officials to figure out exactly how the money will be disbursed.

Another bill to eliminate the tribe’s 5 percent sales tax on fresh fruit and vegetables sold on the Navajo Nation went into effect Oct. 1.

Shelly vetoed another version of the junk food tax earlier this year. His spokesman, Deswood Tome, said Friday that the latest version is clearer on how it will be implemented.

Representatives of the beverage industry had lobbied the tribe to reject the tax, saying it would create problems for retailers and doesn’t solve health problems. It also applies to sports drinks, fruit juice and pita chips.

The tax won’t add significantly to the price of junk food, but buying food on the reservation presents obstacles that don’t exist in most of urban America. The reservation is a vast 27,000 square miles with few grocery stores and a population with an unemployment rate of around 50 percent. Thousands of people live without electricity and have no way of storing perishable food items for too long.

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