Teen Kids News Covers STAND’s Kick Butts Day at the State Capitol

January 7, 2015

 

STAND is featured as an episode of Teen Kids News, an emmy award winning TV Show aimed at teens. The program airs in at least 88 markets and the show is also made available through educational networks to more than 10,000 schools with 7.5 million students and teachers; and it airs on the American Forces Network, with a reach of 1 million.

The program aired September 27, 2014 and January 3, 2015.


Arizona’s anti-tobacco programs performing well but underfunded

January 7, 2015

By Sandra Haros , Reporter KTAR | January 6, 2015

 

Unlike other U.S. states, Arizona is doing well when it comes funding for anti-tobacco programs, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

“We rank well within the top ten in terms of funding dedicated to these types of programs,” said Wayne Tormala, ADHS Chief for the Bureau of Tobacco and Chronic Disease.

Arizona, indeed, ranks 8th in total money spent on tobacco prevention programs.

However, according to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the state is guilty of underfunding the programs. A recent report suggests the state will spend just under 19 million dollars on these types of programs that have proven efficient in stopping kids from smoking. According to the campaign’s website, only North Dakota and Alaska currently fund tobacco prevention programs at the levels recommended by the Center for Disease Control.

“Relative to other states, we are doing quite well,” Tormala rebutted. “In fact, over the past few years, over 100,000 teenagers have quit smoking.”

In a report issued late last year, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids revealed that more than 50,000 Arizona high school students smoke — about 14 percent of all such students in the state. That number is about two percent lower than adults who smoke in the state.

The campaign also reported that Arizona ranks 17th in percent of CDS-recommended funding levels. The U.S. as a whole, it says, cumulatively spent just 1.9 percent of its overall tobacco revenue in 2014 on tobacco prevention programs.

 

http://ktar.com/22/1796290/Arizonas-antitobacco-programs-performing-well-but-underfunded


Ironwood HS STAND Gets featured in Peoria Pulse

January 7, 2015

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County bans e-cigarettes: County buildings, vehicles now smoke and vapor free

December 16, 2014

File photoE-cigarettes, emitting a vapor, have been banned from all county buildings and vehicles.

File photo E-cigarettes, emitting a vapor, have been banned from all county buildings and vehicles

Joanna Dodder Nellans
The Daily Courier

Yavapai County supervisors agreed to a new countywide policy Monday that bans e-cigarettes in county buildings and vehicles.

They also agreed to a new Human Resources Department proposal to require all employee disciplinary action appeal hearings to be open to the public.

A new state law requires such hearings to be public if they relate to certain law enforcement positions, a county Human Resources memo explains. So HR is proposing a single policy that would make all such hearings open. Currently, county hearings to appeal disciplinary actions are automatically closed to the public unless employees ask for them to be public.

The county didn’t get any employee comments about the HR policy changes relating to appeal hearings and e-cigarettes, HR Director Wendy Ross said.

Supervisor Rowle Simmons cited a Sunday New York Times article about how China manufactures 90 percent of the world’s e-cigarettes, aka electronic cigarettes, personal vaporizers and electronic nicotine delivery systems.

The article states that the industry has little oversight, and studies have found tin particles and other metals in e-cigarette vapors that appear to come from the “solder joints” of e-cigarettes.

Supervisor Jack Smith said any kind of smoking in county vehicles could reduce their sale value.

“For me, there’s a zero tolerance on it,” Smith said.

The HR department will continue to work on revisions to a third policy after hearing employee comments, Ross said. A draft would ban the use of electronic equipment while county employees are driving, but it would allow them to use hands-free cell phones.

Ross said she’ll probably bring that draft policy to the supervisors in January.

Also at Monday’s meeting:

• Supervisor Chip Davis asked his fellow supervisors to vote against his proposal to donate $4,500 of his district’s park fund money to the City of Sedona to build a wildlife viewing platform at the Sedona Wetlands Preserve, where the city processes and cleans wastewater.

Davis explained that voters apparently don’t want non-essential services since the majority voted in November against doubling the county’s jail sales tax to build a new jail in Prescott.

“I’m going to take the first step and ask that we not honor that” request for $4,500, Davis said. “The citizens have spoken and nothing is sacred.”

• The supervisors approved using the remaining $30,463 in the Yavapai County Water Advisory Committee fund to collect hydrologic data in the Verde Valley.

Most of the remaining money, $27,500, was contributed by municipalities in the Verde Valley.

The committee hasn’t met since the summer, shortly after most of the supervisors said they wanted to dissolve the 15-year-old group. They stopped paying dues and also stopped paying for the committee’s long-time coordinator position.

It was the only organization that brought the county and all its municipalities and tribes together to discuss common issues.

Follow Joanna Dodder on Twitter @joannadodder


Students take lead at Great American Smokeout

December 11, 2014
Photo: Courtesy Maricopa County Department of Public Health Dominique Arvizu, a senior at right, explains to her Ironwood High School classmate Abraham Smith, a sophomore, that he has passed a carbon monoxide breath test with flying colors. They were practicing with the device to help any smokers who stopped by their educational display outside a CVS store Nov. 20.  

Photo: Courtesy Maricopa County Department of Public Health
Dominique Arvizu, a senior at right, explains to her Ironwood High School classmate Abraham Smith, a sophomore, that he has passed a carbon monoxide breath test with flying colors. They were practicing with the device to help any smokers who stopped by their educational display outside a CVS store Nov. 20.

 Thursday, December 11, 2014

Several students from Ironwood High School participated in the Great American Smokeout Nov. 20, challenging some customers at a nearby CVS pharmacy store to quit cold turkey and helping others make a plan to stop smoking.

Jo Ann Brown, a prevention specialist for the Maricopa County Department of Public Health, credited CVS with removing all cigarettes and tobacco products from its shelves last month and making a store available for the educational efforts of those students.

About 10 local youth attended that event on the sidewalk of the CVS store at 75th Avenue and Cactus Road. They belong to Students Taking a New Direction, an anti-tobacco coalition of teens and students from across Arizona.

Dominique Arvizu, a high school senior and a cousin to Brown, serves as secretary of the club at Ironwood. She began recruiting students in August, primarily through lunchtime events, and the club now has 30 active members. Read the rest of this entry »


One hour of hookah is as bad for you as 100 cigarettes

December 10, 2014
ADEM ALTAN/AFP  Courtesy: vox.com

ADEM ALTAN/AFP Courtesy: vox.com

www. vox.com

Lots of college students hugely underestimate the risk of smoking hookah, a new federal report shows.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published new data about 500 undergrad and graduate students at the University of South Florida, on their views on and uses of the increasingly popular waterpipe.

They discovered that more than half of the students (54.4 percent) had smoked hookah — also known as shisha —  at some point in their lives, and 16 percent had used hookah recently, in the past 30 days. This squares with a broader trend the CDC has documented: that young people in this country are increasingly using hookah along with other non-cigarette tobacco products, like e-cigarettes.

But the most unsettling part of the study was the utter lack of awareness about harms related to hookah: more than half of the students thought smoking from a waterpipe is less dangerous than cigarette smoking and 13 percent thought hookah wasn’t harmful at all.

What is hookah?

Before we get into the harms, let’s look at how hookah works: it is essentially a tobacco delivery device that cools and filters smoke through water.

Read the rest of this entry »


Gilbert becomes third Arizona city to regulate e-cigarettes

November 12, 2014

image

The regulation came after the town received several complaints of people using e-cigarettes inside the Freestone Recreation Center. Councilwoman Jenn Daniels said she had seen people using them in the Town Hall lobby.

The council first discussed an e-cigarette ordinance in June, but held off until council members spoke with supporters, opponents and businesses.
E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices and release a vapor that contains nicotine but no tobacco.
The Food and Drug Administration has yet to regulate e-cigarettes, and there is little conclusive research regarding the long-term effects of inhaling e-cigarette vapor. Some states and cities have taken regulation into their own hands, including Arizona, which prohibits minors from purchasing them.

In August, Tempe became the first city in Arizona to regulate e-cigarettes with an amendment prohibiting their use in public areas, including private businesses and workplaces. Neighboring Guadalupe passed a similar ordinance around the same time.

Read the rest of this entry »